Covid POV: How Students Feel about Hybrid Learning

Paige Murdock, Staff Writer

With the drastic changes that the public has endured due to Covid-19, everyone in the school community had to evolve with the altered conditions of hybrid scheduling. Students and faculty are grateful to have at least some classes in person, but this new way of learning has been quite the change for everyone. Now that Pinkerton Academy has been using hybrid scheduling for the first few months of school, different perspectives have been circulating regarding student’s thoughts about Plan B. Pinkerton Academy has done what they can to overcome the obstacles of learning half in school and half at home, but opinion is needed to improve what works and change what does not. 

As of October 19, 2020 according to the WMUR news, 9,700 have tested positive for Covid 19 in New Hampshire. The school has taken the safety of their students in with new hygiene and social distancing policies. Only allowing 50 percent capacity, required masks, and social distancing are just a few new additions, but is the school doing enough? The current Plan B that the school is following allows students to choose hybrid or full remote, has a strict social distancing and mask policy, and gives out resources that would normally be available even with this change in scheduling. Small things like packaging lunches, only using specific exits to control the crowds, and large spacing in lunch seating helps students feel even more secure than they were before. 

Ben Madore (21) said, “The way they organized the classes and lunches, they did pretty good for the short time that they had to plan it.”

Madore feels as though more than enough is being done for the students and faculty safety. The school’s plan for reopening was set up by the guidelines of  the department of health, meaning there are not many more things the school can alter during this time. 

 “Senior year has been hitting pretty hard… I feel like I’m being bombarded with work,” said Madore.

He also mentioned that it is very difficult to navigate through assignments and complete work since teachers have to be leading separate lessons in person and remotely. 

Similarly, Brianne Murdock (22) said, “There is so much more work than last year. But they have definitely given us more time to get work done, like the Academy Plan.’” Murdock also thinks that her first few months have been more difficult than years passed, but the school has also given more time to complete it. 

Students have all said the same thing when it comes to workload, which is that many have become overwhelmed with the amount of assignments. This could be explained by the change in the length of classes. Additionally, the school has allowed students more time away from class, meaning more time outside of school to complete work. Only two semesters rather than four quarters is one way that the school has tried to take some stress away, since there is much more time prior to grades closing compared to before. 

If students are struggling with hybrid learning, the possibility that teachers are struggling is also real.

Math teacher Mrs. Kelly Worsman said, ¨I was thankful that last spring when remote learning happened that I had developed a decent connection and relationship with each of my classes and students ahead of time. It made it easier to still connect remotely. Starting the year off with new classes, it is more challenging to get the connections established.”

The lack of class time has taken a toll on how learning has progressed in her classes, but she shared that there are some adjustments that help students adapt. 

One way she was able to adapt was consistency.

¨I want my students to always feel that I am accessible and that the course is easy to navigate. I use the same platform to assess students on a day to day basis as we use for quizzes and tests so that they are comfortable with the platform and don’t have something else to worry about. I also try to keep it light and fun as much as possible,” said Worsman.

Worsman’s goal, like so many teachers, is to make class as normal as possible to balance with our constantly changing situation.